Student notebook of Ebenezer Parkman, 1720

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Content Notes

The small hardcover notebook contains a manuscript copy of Charles Morton's Natural Philosophy copied by student Ebenezer Parkman (Harvard Class of 1721) in 1720, as well as notes on Hebrew grammar. The flyleaf has a faded note, "[This copy] was probably made by Parkman H.U. 1721 afterward minister of Westboro." The title page of the volume includes the handwritten title "Phylosophia Natvralis: Naturall Philosophy, By the Reverd Mr. Charles Morton Pastor of a Church in Charles Town, Beegan [sic] to recite it December 11, 1720 Willm Brattle's Book 1720 ended January 30 Anno Domini 1720 [January 30, 1720/1721]." The final page of the transcription is signed and dated "June 18, 1720 Parkman." The last pages of the volume consist of notes on Hebrew Grammar titled "Instruction in Hebrew."

Biographical Notes

Ebenezer Parkman, a Westborough, Mass. minister, was born in Boston on September 5, 1703. He graduated from Harvard College in 1721, and received his AM in 1724. He was the first minister of Westborough from 1724 until his death on December 9, 1782.|Charles Morton, an educator and Harvard's first vice-president, was born in 1627 in Cornwall, England. He received his first degree in 1649 from Oxford University and received an MA in 1652. He established the Newington Green Academy near London and began compiling "systems" used as manuals for student study. He immigrated to Massachusetts in 1686 believing he would be appointed President of Harvard College. Though he was not appointed President, he taught as a fellow and the College began using his manuscript textbooks as part of the undergraduate course of study; Morton's Compendium Physicae was the College's official physics textbook into the 18th century. He was appointed a member of the Harvard Corporation and its first vice-president. Morton died in 1698.