Receipt book of James Jackson, 1800-1802 (inclusive)

To cite this material, use the information provided in the "Cite" tab in the top menu of the viewer with the digitized image. Please also add Colonial North America at Harvard Library to each citation.
Launch viewer
To cite this material, use the information provided in the "Cite" tab in the top menu of the viewer with the digitized image. Please also add Colonial North America at Harvard Library to each citation.

Content Notes

Contains recipes for medicines and methods of administering them to patients, written by Dr. James Jackson (1777-1867) from 1800 to 1802. Recipes include "Solutio Myrrh," a solution of gum myrrh, camphor, and infusion of serpentaria (snakeroot) for sore throat and fever, and "Succus Beta," a solution containing beet juice, used for headaches, as well as formulas for various pills, elixirs, and tinctures. There are several pages recording medicines Jackson created for unknown patients in 1802, including a tincture of Spanish fly, containing cantharides, cochneal, and liquor. A section entitled "Almshouse Medicine" contains additional recipes.

Biographical Notes

James Jackson (1777-1867), A.B., 1796, Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts, a physician in Boston, Massachusetts, served as Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physic at Harvard from 1812 to 1836; Hersey Professor Emeritus from 1836 to 1867; and as a member of the Harvard Board of Overseers from 1844 to 1846. Jackson was one of the first physicians in America to promote smallpox vaccination, helped reorganize and rebuild the Harvard Medical School, after the program moved to Boston, and was largely responsible for the establishment of the Massachusetts General Hospital.