Student essays composed by Francis Dana Channing, 1792 and undated

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About this Item

Creator
Channing, Francis Dana , 1775-1810
Type
Harvard students' essays.
Language
English
Origin
Massachusetts
Description
.01 cubic feet (1 folder)
Date
1792
Repository
Harvard University Archives
Identifier
colonialnorthamerica.library.harvard.edu/990097068740203941_HUL.ARCH:27824391

Content Notes

Two handwritten essays composed in English by Harvard student Francis Channing while he was an undergraduate at Harvard. The first document is a three-page handwritten essay on the topic of greed titled with a quote from Virgil: “Auri facra fames.” The essay begins, “Nothing tends more to the disparagement of the human character, than that insatiable desire of wealth…” The verso of the last page is signed "Channing May 4th 1792." The second document is an undated four-page handwritten essay on the topic of sympathy titled with a quote from Virgil: “"Non ignara mali, miseris succurrere disco.” The essay begins, “The various scenes, which are presented to our views in the drama of life…” Both texts include a small number of edits and struck-out words.

Biographical Notes

Francis Dana Channing (1775-1810), a Boston lawyer, was born on August 20, 1775 in Newport, Rhode Island. He received an AB from Harvard in 1794 and an AM in 1797. Channing practiced law in Boston, and in 1801 delivered the Phi Beta Kappa oration at Harvard. Channing died of consumption on November 8, 1810. His son William Henry Channing was a member of the Harvard Class of 1829.