Student essays composed by James Jackson, 1795: Omnia non possumus omnes

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About this Item

Creator
Jackson, James , 1777-1867
Type
Harvard students' essays.
Language
English
Origin
Massachusetts
Description
.01 cubic feet (1 folder)
Date
1795
Repository
Harvard University Archives
Identifier
colonialnorthamerica.library.harvard.edu/990097069590203941_HUL.ARCH:27824393

Content Notes

Two handwritten student essays composed by James Jackson in 1795 as a Harvard undergraduate. The first essay is untitled and begins, “After a very warm day in the month of August, I had recruited myself by an evening walk with a couple of friends.” The theme describes a visit by an angel named Aspheleion, and discusses morality and hope. The front of the notebook is inscribed “Jackson Sept’r 1795.” The second essay is titled “Omnia non possumus omnes,” and begins “Sauntering one day down the mall in Boston…” The essay relates a dialogue between an old man and young man about education. The essay is signed “Jackson Cambridge Dec’ 12th 1795.”

Biographical Notes

James Jackson (1777-1867), a Harvard Medical School professor, was born in Newburyport, Mass., on October 3, 1777. He received an AB from Harvard in 1796, an AM in 1799, and an MD in 1809. Jackson practiced medicine in Boston, and was the Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physic at Harvard Medical School from 1812 to 1836, and dean of the Medical School from 1820 to 1821. Jackson died on August 27, 1867.