Mathematical notebook attributed to Thaddeus Mason Harris, ca. 1787: Vulgar fractions: Duodecimals. By practice, applied to work performed by glaziers, paviors, painters, joiners, and to measuring by the square of 100 feet, applied to flooring, tyling, and partitioning. Likewise measuring of round, squared & unequal squared lumber: Addition of vulgar fractions: A variety of questions to exercise the learner in the rules of arithmetic

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About this Item

Type
Harvard students' notes.Harvard textbooks.
Language
English
Origin
Massachusetts
Description
.12 cubic feet (1 volume)|1 v. ([56], 18, 71 p.) ; ca. 20 cm.
Repository
Harvard University Archives
Identifier
colonialnorthamerica.library.harvard.edu/990097596240203941

Content Notes

Hardcover notebook containing handwritten transcriptions of rules, cases, and examples from 18th century mathematical texts. The author and purpose of the volume is unclear, though it has been connected with Thaddeus Mason Harris (Harvard AB 1787). Most of the entries include questions and related answers, suggesting the notebook was used as a manuscript textbook and workbook. The extracts appear to be copied from John Dean's " Practical arithmetic" (published in 1756 and 1761), Daniel Fenning's "The young algebraist's companion" (published in multiple editions beginning in 1750), and Martin Clare's "Youth's introduction to trade and business" (extracts first included in 1748 edition).

Biographical Notes

Thaddeus Mason Harris (1768-1842) was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts on July 7, 1768. He received an AB from Harvard College in 1787 and was invited later in the same year to become private secretary to General George Washington. He was prevented from accepting the position, though, by an attack of smallpox. He then served as the interim librarian of the Harvard College Library for three months in 1787. In 1791 he was appointed librarian at Harvard, a position he held until he became pastor of the First Unitarian Church in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1793. He was awarded an honorary S.T.D. (Doctor of Sacred Theology) by Harvard in 1813. He remained as pastor in Dorchester until three years before his death in April 1842.