Benjamin Barton Smith notebook on materia medica circa 1796-1798

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About this Item

Creator
Barton, Benjamin Smith , 1766-1815
Type
Lecture notes.
Language
English
Origin
Pennsylvania
Description
1 volume; 25 x 20 x 5 centimeters.
Repository
Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Identifier
colonialnorthamerica.library.harvard.edu/990127346570203941_HMS.COUNT:37550804

Content Notes

Volume of notes for lectures by University of Pennsylvania Professor of Materia Medica Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815), circa 1796-1798. Includes an introduction and remarks on materia alimentaria (food), followed by lectures on astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and other therapies. The end of the volume contains several medical recipes for conditions like rheumatism and gonorrhea.
  • In English.

Biographical Notes

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815), a naturalist and physician, was Professor of Materia Medica from 1796 to 1813 and Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine from 1813 to 1815 at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton was born in 1766 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, to Esther Rittenhouse (died 1774), sister of astronomer David Rittenhouse (1732-1796), and Reverend Thomas Barton (1730?-1780). Barton entered the College of Philadelphia in 1784; in 1786, he transferred to the University of Edinburgh, but he left in 1788 without an M.D. He returned to Philadelphia to practice medicine in 1789, and he was appointed Professor of Natural History and Botany at the College of Philadelphia the same year. The school merged with the University of Pennsylvania in 1791, and in 1796, Barton became Professor of Materia Medica, although he continued to lecture in natural history. In 1798, he succeeded Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) as Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine. Barton also worked as a physician at Pennsylvania Hospital from 1798 until his death. In 1790, Barton was elected to a fellowship at Philadelphia's College of Physicians, and in 1792, he was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was the founder and first president of Philadelphia Linnaean Society. Barton published a number of works on botany and the medicinal use of plants, including Collections for an essay towards a materia medica of the United States (1798) and Elements of botany (1804). He also was editor of the Philadelphia Medical and Physical Journal from 1805 to 1808. Barton additionally was an advisor to the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-1806).