Abraham Howe and Emory Howard account book, 1793-1892 (inclusive), 1793-1873 (bulk)

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Content Notes

Account book kept by farmer Abraham Howe (born 1776), of Bolton, Massachusetts, from May 1793 to July 1809, and by farmer and shoemaker Emory Howard (born 1812), of Holden, Massachusetts, from March 1842 to December 1873. Abraham Howe’s accounts concern farm labor and other activities for which he hired himself out, including carpentry. Emory Howard's accounts primarily relate to his earnings from shoemaking, although he sold farm produce and hired himself out for day labor as well. There is also a family history of Emory Howard penciled in at a later date. The endpapers and first several pages of the volume contain newspaper clippings and handwritten veterinary medical recipes, Horsford’s Calendar 1892, and decorative paper pasted in. At the end of the volume is an illustration of an unidentified couple and an advertisement for Kohler’s Antidote. The collection also contains a loose volume with an alphabetical index of entries for both Howe’s and Howard’s accounts. It is unclear how Emory Howard came into possession of the book.

Biographical Notes

Abraham Howe, son of Phineas and Experience (Pollard) Howe, was born in Bolton, Massachusetts on June 24, 1776. He married Elizabeth Rolfe of Concord, New Hampshire on February 14, 1796. The Howes moved to New Hampshire after their marriage, then to Maine, before returning to Holden, Massachusetts, where Abraham Howe worked as a day laborer and farmer. Emory Howard, son of Amos and Damaris (Bennett) Howard, was born in Holden, Massachusetts on March 17, 1812. In addition to owning and operating a farm, Howard engaged in the shoemaking trade with particular expertise in crimping (shaping the vamp of a boot or shoe) and treeing (final cleaning and polishing). Howard married Emily Knight on March 9, 1837, and the couple had four children.